Heat overtakes heat… 2016 forecast ‘temperature’ to hit a record high

Heat overtakes heat… 2016 forecast ‘temperature’ to hit a record high

Human activity impacted climate change

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An artist in Marrakesh, Morocco (8th, local time), paints a mural symbolizing the earth that suffers from serious environmental pollution. The 22th session of the Conference of Parties (COP22) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will be held in Marrakesh from Nov.7 to 18. (Newsis)
An artist in Marrakesh, Morocco (8th, local time), paints a mural symbolizing the earth that suffers from serious environmental pollution. The 22th session of the Conference of Parties (COP22) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will be held in Marrakesh from Nov.7 to 18. (Newsis)

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) predicted that the average global temperature in 2016 would record at an all-time high since weather observations began. Until now, the five-year period from 2011 to 2015 has been the hottest recorded temperature in human history, but in the two months to come, a new record will be set in 2016.
WMO pointed out human activity impacted climate change, and analyzed that phenomenons such as global warming and El Nino are occurring because of greenhouse gases which is the reason why the Earth is becoming warmer.

The average global temperature rose over 1 degree Celsius for the first time in 2015 since the Industrial Revolution. WMO recorded the period from 2011 to 2015 as the hottest time in Earth’s history. The average global temperature (14℃) for 30 years from 1961 to 1990 rose on average 0.57℃. In particular, the average land surface temperature was highest in 2015, however compared to the average temperature for 30 years (1961 to 1990) it has increased by 0.76℃.

The serious problem is that fast rising temperatures could be recorded again in 2016. WMO analyzed that the high temperatures of 2015 is continuing to 2016.
The international community at the Paris Agreement set a global target to limit rising temperatures to less than 2℃, if possible, under 1.5℃, but some of the top scientists in the world are pessimistic about achieving that goal and said it will be difficult if not impossible to hit.

Petteri Taalas, the WMO Secretary-General, cautioned of the dangers of climate change at the 22nd United Nations Climate Change Conference held in Marrakesh, Morocco, on Nov. 8.
“Climate Change have been consistently visible on a global scale since the 1980’s: rising global temperature, both over land and in the ocean; sea-level rise; and the widespread melting of ice. It has increased the risks of extreme weather events like that of heat waves, drought and floods,” said Professor Taalas, WMO Secretary-General.
The 22nd United Nations Climate Change Conference will be held in Morocco, from Nov.7 to18. The Ministry of Environment explained this Conference will be a chance for the global world to join forces to carry out the Paris Agreement.

Journalist, Eunhee Jo [ceh@newshankuk.com]